INSIGHTS, NEWS & DISCOVERIES
FROM IOACTIVE RESEARCHERS

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Multiple Critical Vulnerabilities Found in Popular Motorized Hoverboards

By Thomas Kilbride
Not that long ago, motorized hoverboards were in the news – according to widespread reports, they had a tendency to catch on fire and even explode. Hoverboards were so dangerous that the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) issued a statement recommending consumers “look for indications of acceptance by recognized testing organizations” when purchasing the devices. Consumers were even advised to not leave them unattended due to the risk of fires. The Federal Trade Commission has since established requirements that any hoverboard imported to the US meet baseline safety requirements set by Underwriters Laboratories.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

WannaCry vs. Petya: Keys to Ransomware Effectiveness

By Daniel Miessler
With WannaCry and now Petya we’re beginning to see how and why the new strain of ransomware worms are evolving and growing far more effective than previous versions.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

APIs are 2FA Backdoors

By Daniel Miessler
Two-factor Authentication (2FA) today is something like having a firewall in the year 2000: if you say you have it, it basically stops any further questioning.

Unfortunately, when you have a powerful and mismanaged API, 2FA is about as effective as having a stateful firewall protecting a broken web application.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Post #WannaCry Reaction #127: Do I Need a Pen Test?

By Daniel Miessler
In the wake of WannaCry and other recent events, everyone from the Department of Homeland Security to my grandmother are recommending penetration tests as a silver bullet to prevent falling victim to the next cyber attack. But a penetration test is not a silver bullet, nor is it universally what is needed for improving the security posture of an organization. There are several key factors to consider. So I thought it might be good to review the difference between a penetration test and a vulnerability assessment since this is a routine source of confusion in the market. In fact, I’d venture to say that while there is a lot of good that comes from a penetration test, what people actually more often need is a vulnerability assessment.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

#WannaCry: Examining Weaponized Malware

By Brad Hegrat
Attribution: You Keep Using That Word, I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means...
In internal discussions in virtual halls of IOActive this morning, there were many talks about the collective industry’s rush to blame or attribution over the recent WanaCry/WannaCrypt ransomware breakouts. Twitter was lit up on #Wannacry and #WannaCrypt and even Microsoft got into the action, stating, We need governments to consider the damage to civilians that comes from hoarding these vulnerabilities and the use of these exploits.”

Opinions for blame and attribution spanned the entire spectrum of response, from the relatively sane…

Saturday, May 13, 2017

We’re gonna need a bigger boat....

By Brad Hegrat
A few weeks ago back in mid-March (2017), Microsoft issued a security bulletin (MS17-010) and patch for a vulnerability that was yet to be publicly disclosed or referenced. According to the bulletin, “the most severe of the vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if an attacker sends specially crafted messages to a Microsoft Server Message Block 1.0 (SMBv1) server. This security update is rated Critical for all supported releases of Microsoft Windows.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Vulnerabilities

By Tao Sauvage
Last year I acquired a Linksys Smart Wi-Fi router, more specifically the EA3500 Series. I chose Linksys (previously owned by Cisco and currently owned by Belkin) due to its popularity and I thought that it would be interesting to have a look at a router heavily marketed outside of Asia, hoping to have different results than with my previous research on the BHU Wi-Fi uRouter, which is only distributed in China.

Smart Wi-Fi is the latest family of Linksys routers and includes more than 20 different models that use the latest 802.11N and 802.11AC standards. Even though they can be remotely managed from the Internet using the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi free service, we focused our research on the router itself.