INSIGHTS, NEWS & DISCOVERIES
FROM IOACTIVE RESEARCHERS

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Vulnerabilities

By Tao Sauvage

Last year I acquired a Linksys Smart Wi-Fi router, more specifically the EA3500 Series. I chose Linksys (previously owned by Cisco and currently owned by Belkin) due to its popularity and I thought that it would be interesting to have a look at a router heavily marketed outside of Asia, hoping to have different results than with my previous research on the BHU Wi-Fi uRouter, which is only distributed in China.

Smart Wi-Fi is the latest family of Linksys routers and includes more than 20 different models that use the latest 802.11N and 802.11AC standards. Even though they can be remotely managed from the Internet using the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi free service, we focused our research on the router itself.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Hacking Robots Before Skynet

By Cesar Cerrudo (@cesarcer) and Lucas Apa (@lucasapa)

Robots are going mainstream in both private and public sectors - on military missions, performing surgery, building skyscrapers, assisting customers at stores, as healthcare attendants, as business assistants, and interacting closely with our families in a myriad of ways. Robots are already showing up in many of these roles today, and in the coming years they will become an ever more prominent part of our home and business lives. But similar to other new technologies, recent IOActive research has found robotic technologies to be highly insecure in a variety of ways that could pose serious threats to the people and organizations they operate in and around.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Harmful prefetch on Intel

By Enrique Nissim

We've seen a lot of articles and presentations that show how the prefetch instruction can be used to bypass modern OS kernel implementations of ASLR. Most of the public work however only focuses on getting base addresses of modules with the idea of building a ROP chain or maybe patching some pointer/value of the data section. This post represents an extension of previous work, as it documents the usage of prefetch to discover PTEs on Windows 10. 

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

In Flight Hacking System

By Ruben Santamarta

In my five years with IOActive, I’ve had the opportunity to visit some awesome places, often thousands of kilometers from home. So flying has obviously been an integral part of my routine. You might not think that’s such a big deal, unless like me, you’re afraid of flying. I don't think I can completely get rid of that anxiety; after dozens of flights my hands still sweat during takeoff, but I've learned to live with it, even enjoying it sometimes…and spending some flights hacking stuff.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Let's Terminate XML Schema Vulnerabilities

By Fernando Arnaboldi

XML eXternal Entity (XXE) attacks are a common threat to applications using XML schemas, either actively or unknowingly. That is because we continue to use XML schemas that can be abused in multiple ways. Programming languages and libraries use XML schemas to define the expected contents of XML documents, SAML authentications or SOAP messages. XML schemas were intended to constrain document definitions, yet they have introduced multiple attack avenues.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Five Attributes of an Effective Corporate Red Team

By Daniel Miessler and Ryan O'Horo

After talking recently with colleagues at IOActive as well as some heads of industry-leading red teams, we wanted to share a list of attributes that we believe are key to any effective Red Team.

[ NOTE: For debate about the relevant terminology, we suggest Daniel's post titled The Difference Between Red, Blue, and Purple Teams. ]

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Multiple Vulnerabilities in BHU WiFi “uRouter”

By Tao Sauvage

A Wonderful (and !Secure) Router from China


The BHU WiFi uRouter, manufactured and sold in China, looks great – and it contains multiple critical vulnerabilities. An unauthenticated attacker could bypass authentication, access sensitive information stored in its system logs, and in the worst case, execute OS commands on the router with root privileges. In addition, the uRouter ships with hidden users, SSH enabled by default and a hardcoded root password…and injects a third-party JavaScript file into all users’ HTTP traffic.

In this blog post, we cover the main security issues found on the router, and describe how to exploit the UART debug pins to extract the firmware and find security vulnerabilities.